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This is a picture of Dr. Amy Leach of FSSH at UOIT

Amy Leach
PhD

Associate Professor

Faculty of Social Science and Humanities

Contact information

2 Simcoe Street - Room 621
Downtown Oshawa
2000 Simcoe Street North
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4

905.721.8668 ext. 3706

amy.leach@uoit.ca
amymayleach.com


Background

Dr. Amy-May Leach received her Master of Arts in Developmental Psychology degree in 2002 and her PhD in Social Psychology in 2006, both from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. She also has the unique experience of having worked as a Canada Border Services Agency Officer for four years. Thus, she has direct experience with the factors that affect forensic interviewing and decision-making.

Education

  • Master of Arts in Developmental Psychology Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario 2002
  • PhD in Social Psychology Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario 2006

Courses taught

  • Developmental Psychology
  • Introductory Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Research and expertise

  • lie detection
  • confessions and interrogations
  • eyewitness memory
  • wrongful convictions
  • detecting lies in children and adults
  • false confessions
  • eyewitness identifications
  • stigma of wrongful conviction

• PhD thesis supervisor for Lyndsay Woolridge (2016 to present). The role of accentedness, fluency, and grammar in the detection of non-native speakers’ deception.

• PhD thesis supervisor for Elizabeth Elliott (2015 to present). Underlying components of lie detection decisions.

  • Master of Arts (MA) thesis supervisor for Elizabeth Solodukhin (2013 to 2015). Lying in a non-native language: Effects on emotionality and cognitive load.
  • MA thesis supervisor for Renee Snellings (2011 to 2013). The effect of language proficiency on second-language lie detection.
  • MA thesis supervisor for Cayla S. Da Silva (2009 to 2011). Detecting deception in second-language speakers.

2011: SSHRC, Insight Development Grant. Leach, A.-M., & Ammar, N. (Collaborator). Behind the veil: Detecting the deception of concealed witnesses.

2011: SSHRC, Standard Research Grant. Leach, A.-M.Language proficiency and deception detection.

2010: American Psychology-Law Society, Grant-in-Aid. Leach, A.-M. Detecting the deception of second-language speakers.

2010: Office of Research Services/SSHRC, Internal Grant. The effect of observation on deception.

2008: Office of Research Services/SSHRC, Internal Grant.Leach, A.-M. The effects of second-language interviews on lie detection strategies.

Involvement

  • Selected publications

    Leach, A.-M., Snellings, R. L. & Gazaille, M. (in press; accepted April 13, 2017). Observers’ language proficiencies and the detection of non-native speakers’ deception. Applied Cognitive Psychology.

    Lawrence, H., Akehurst, L., Leach, A.-M., Cherryman, J., Vrij, A., Arathoon, M., & Vernham, Z. (2017). “Look this way”: Using gaze maintenance to facilitate the detection of children’s false reports. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 31, 69-80.

    Elliott, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2016). You must be lying because I don’t understand you: Language proficiency and lie detection. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 22, 488-499.

    Leach, A.-M., Ammar, N., England, D. N., Remigio, L. M., Kleinberg, B., & Verschuere, B. (2016). Less is more?: Detecting lies in veiled witnesses. Law and Human Behavior, 40, 401-410.

    Beaudry, J. L., Lindsay, R. C. L., Leach, A.-M., Mansour, J. K., Bertrand, M. I., & Kalmet, N. (2015). The impact of evidence type, identification accuracy, lineup presentation, and lineup administration on observer belief of eyewitnesses. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 20, 343-364.

    Clow, K. A., & Leach, A.-M. (2015). Stigma and wrongful conviction: All exonerees are not perceived equal. Psychology, Crime, & Law, 21, 172-185.

    Clow, K. A., & Leach, A.-M. (2015). After innocence: Perceptions of individuals who have been wrongfully convicted. Legal & Criminological Psychology, 20, 147-164.

  • Presentations

    Woolridge, L., Elliott, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2017, June). Unpacking proficiency to predict observers’ deception detection bias. Poster presented at the Canadian Psychological Association’s National Convention, Toronto, Ontario.

    Elliott, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2017, March). Do actions speak louder than words? An evaluation of deception cues according to proficiency and paradigm. Paper presented at the American Psychology-Law Society’s Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington.

    Woolridge, L., & Leach, A.-M. (2017, March). Dissonance and deception: Can misattributions of arousal facilitate the ability to detect deception? Poster presented at the American Psychology-Law Society’s Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington.

    Elliott, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2016, March). What do language barriers reveal about cues to deception? Paper presented at the American Psychology-Law Society’s Annual Conference, Atlanta, Georgia.

    Arnhold, A., Akehurst, L., Figueiredo, I., & Leach, A.-M. (2015, August). Do foreigners sound like liars? Paper presented at the European Association of Psychology and Law, Nuremberg, Germany.

    Lawrence, H., Akehurst, L., & Leach, A.-M. (2015, June). Imposing cognitive load through gaze maintenance to detect deception in child witnesses. Paper presented at the Society for Research in Memory and Cognition’s Biennial Conference, Victoria, Canada.

    Solodukhin, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2015, June). The impact of language proficiency and cognitive load on lie detection and confidence. Paper presented at the Society for Research in Memory and Cognition’s Biennial Conference, Victoria, Canada.

    Leach, A.-M., Ammar, N., England, D. N., & Remigio, L. M. (2015, March). Lie detection and the niqab. Paper presented at the American Psychology-Law Society’s Annual Conference, San Diego, California.

    Solodukhin, E., & Leach, A.-M. (2015, March). Effects of language, paradigm, and cues on lie detection decisions. Paper presented at the American Psychology-Law Society’s Annual Conference, San Diego, California.

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