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Political Science Faculty

Image of Dr. Shanti Fernando

Policies for equality, democracy and adult education

Image of Dr. Alyson King

Education and learning in Canadian society

Image of Dr. Tim MacNeill

Politics, economics and sustainable global development

Image of Dr. Scott Aquanno

The impacts of economic restructuring, finance and globalization

Dr. Shanti Fernando
Associate Professor 
shanti.fernando@uoit.ca
Dr. Alyson King 
Program Director and Assistant Professor
alyson.king@uoit.ca
Dr. Tim MacNeill 
Senior Lecturer
timothy.macneill@uoit.ca
Dr. Scott Aquanno
Senior Lecturer
scott.aquannon@uoit.ca

Dr. Fernando is a storyteller; the stories she wants to tell are ones that give voice to those who experience inequality in our society, or ones about people who have demonstrated ways in which we can make a difference in our communities and beyond. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at UOIT. She received her PhD degree in Political Science from Queen's University. The concentration of her work is on policies that support community development including adult education, literacy provision, immigration and settlement, anti-poverty and social service policies. She taught at York University and Mount Allison University before joining UOIT in 2008.

Dr.  Fernando has published on many subjects in Canadian politics and American politics including ethics, immigration, community organizations and adult education. Examples of her publications include her book Race and The City, which explored Chinese-Canadian and Chinese-American community groups as a parallel democratic process in Toronto and Los Angeles. This book examined the history of systemic exclusionary immigration policies and processes, and how community advocacy provided the needed sense of belonging to help fight for greater civil rights. She has also written on adult supported education (which offers specific educational supports for persons with psychiatric disabilities) and on other challenges for those with mental disabilities, including how it affects immigration and settlement, and labour market integration.

Dr. Fernando advocates for evidence-based policy making that engages communities and sees the connections between many societal challenges. For example, policies that increase support for adult education, infrastructure, affordable housing, social services and health services can all be part of an anti-poverty strategy.

She has supervised students in the areas of anti-poverty policies, social services, labour market supports, educational policy and creating greater accessibility to services for those with mental health issues and for women in Canada and internationally.

Curriculum vitae 2016

Research/teaching/supervision areas

  • adult education
  • anti-poverty and anti-racism
  • Canadian politics
  • community development
  • mental health and education
  • political science
  • public policy
  • social and equity policy
  • supported education

Selected publications

Fernando, S. (2016). “Chinese Americans” in The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Nationalism. Eds. John Stone, Dennis Rutledge, Polly Rizova, Anthony Smith, and Xiaoshuo Hou. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Zaidi, A. Fernando, S., Ammar, N., (2015). An exploratory study of the impact of information communication technology (ICT) or computer mediated communication (CMC) on the level of violence and access to service among intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors in Canada. Technology in Society. Vol. 41. 91-97. 

Fernando, S., King, A., Loney, D. (2014). Helping Them Help Themselves: Supported Adult Education for Persons living with Mental Illness. Canadian Journal for Studies in Adult Education. Vol. 27 (1) 15-28.

Fernando, S. et Alyson E. King. (2013). Winners and Losers: Literacy and Enduring Labour Market Inequality in Historical Perspective. Revue Interventions économiques 47. Mis en ligne le 13 février 2013, consulté le 14 février 2013.

Fernando, S. (2012) Chapter 4: Mexican Labour in Canada: A Critical Assessment of the Seasonal/Guest Worker Program. In Dynamics and Trajectories: Canada and/in North America. Eds. A. Nurse and M. Fox. Halifax: Fernwood Books.

Fernando, S. & Earle B. (2011) Linking poverty reduction and economic recovery: supporting community responses to austerity in Ontario. Canadian Review of Social Policy for special issue: Poverty Reduction Strategies: What a Difference an Economic Crisis Makes. 2011 65/66 ( published July 2012).

Fernando, S. (2007). Ethics and Good Urban Governance in Toronto: The Bellamy report and integrity in public service. Canadian Public Administration Journal, 50:3 Fall.

Fernando, S. (2006). Race and the City: Chinese Canadian and Chinese American Political Mobilization. Vancouver: UBC Press.

Articles in refereed conference proceedings

Fernando, S. (2016). Adult Educators as Community Developers. In eds. Laura Lane and Robert McGray Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Conference of CASAE/ACÉÉA,University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Pg 70-75.

Fernando,S. and King, A. (2016). Education Interrupted: Learning Careers of Adults Living with Mental Illness. ESREA Conference 2016 e-book. Forthcoming May 2016.

Eamer, A., Fernando, S., King, A(2015). Still on the margins: English language learning and mental health in immigrant psychiatric patients. In eds. Charles A. Shoniregun and Galyna A. Akmayeva, Proceedings of the Ireland International Conference on Education. (pg 472-477). April, Dublin: Infonomics Society.

King, A., Fernando, S. (2015). Keep Stop Start: Assessing a supported education program for persons living with mental illness. In Proceedings of The Hawaii International Conference on Education 2015 (HICE) Jan 5-8. 

Fernando, S. and King, A. (July 2013). The Economy and Beyond: The Benefits of Life-long Literacy. 32nd National Conference of the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE)/L’Association Canadienne pour l’Étude de I’Éducation des Adultes (ACÉÉA), Conference Proceedings, June 3-5, 2013, University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C. Edited by: Colleen Kawalilak and Janet Groen.

Fernando, Shanti I. and Alyson E. King. (June 2014). Supported Adult Literacy Education for Persons Living with Mental Illness: Quality of Life and Social Implications. Conference Proceedings, Canadian Association for Studies in Adult Education Annual Meeting (CASAE)/L’Association Canadienne pour l’Étude de I’Éducation des Adultes (ACÉÉA )May 24-27, 2014. Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario. (pp.87-91) Edited by: Donovan Plumb.

Recent research grants

Increasing literacies through supported education and policies of inclusion (SSHRC Insight Grant: $169,389)

  • Project will examine supported education programs for adults at psychiatric hospitals across Canada.
  • Dr. Shanti Fernando (PI); UOIT Co-Investigators Dr. Alyson King; Dr. Allyson Eamer; Dr. Tyler Frederick; Dr. Laura Pinto; Collaborators: John Rodnick- Waypoint Centre for Mental Health Care; Kathryn Kunkel Selkirk Mental Health Centre. 
  • five years (2016-2021)

Supported Literacy Education for Persons Living with Mental Illness: Exploring Economic and Social Implications (SSHRC Insight Development Grant: $50,926)

  • Case study of the Supported Education Program at Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, in Whitby, Ontario, to understand the social, economic and political implications of low literacy skills for people living with mental illness.
  • Dr. Shanti Fernando (PI); co-investigators: Drs. Alyson E. King, Allyson Eamer, Wendy Stanyon, UOIT. Collaborator: Ms. Wanda Huntington, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences.
  • two years (2013-2015)

A key strength of Canadian society is its ability to provide access to education for all its citizens. Dr. King conducts research on the experience and success of underrepresented young adults attending university, as well as the impact of education for adults living with mental illness. Those who are unable to attain strong skills in literacy and numeracy, and those without a post-secondary education are at a higher risk of living in poverty. Yet, not everyone is able to fit into the existing education system and many fall through the cracks. Through her research, she is advocating for an improved understanding of how students of all ages and backgrounds can develop the skills, independence and hope necessary for a bright future as contributing members of society.

Dr. King’s other research has examined graphic novels and multiliteracies, how Canadian identity has been portrayed in graphic novels, the history of UOIT, and the history of women university students in Ontario. She joined UOIT in 2004 as an Instructor in the Faculty of Education, and became a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities in 2010, before being appointed Assistant Professor in 2012. During her Bachelor of Arts in Canadian History and International Relations at the University of Toronto (U of T), she began focusing on the absence of women in Canadian and world history. She completed her Master of Arts (on 19th-century women teachers in Ontario) and her PhD in the History of Education (on the experiences of women students in Ontario universities from 1900-1930) at U of T’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

Research/teaching/supervision areas:

  • education and mental health
  • education in Canada
  • global communities
  • history of education
  • international relations
  • social issues and policy
  • social movements
  • supported education for adults living with mental illness
  • student experiences and strategies for success in post-secondary education
  • women’s history and Canadian history

Selected publications

King, Alyson E. (2016). Creating a Canadian identity for children in Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids. Canadian Review of Comparative Literature/Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée, 43(1), 119-136.

McKenzie, Sierra and Alyson E. King. (2016). “A Community College with Ivory Tower Pretensions”: Creating a University Identity. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 46(1), 156 - 175.

King, Alyson E. (2015). Exploring Identity and Multiliteracies through Graphic Narratives. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival, 9(1), 3-20, DOI: 10.1080/15595692.2014.952406.  

Fernando, Shanti, Alyson King, and Danielle Loney. (2014). Helping Them Help Themselves: Supported Adult Education for Persons Living With Mental Illness. The Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education. 27(1), 15-28.

King, Alyson E. and Douai, Aziz. (2014). From the “damsel in distress” to girls’ games and beyond: Gender and children’s gaming. Chapter in Gender Considerations and Influence in the Digital Media and Gaming Industry. Edited by Julie Prescott, University of Central Lancashire and Julie McGurren, Codemasters, UK. IGI Global. DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6142-4.

Fernando, Shanti et Alyson E. King. (2013). Winners and Losers: Literacy and Enduring Labour Market Inequality in Historical Perspective. Revue Interventions économiques 47. Mis en ligne le 13 février 2013, consulté le 14 février 2013.

King, A. (2012). Cartooning history: Canada’s stories in graphic novels. The History Teacher. 45 (2), pp. 189-219.

King, A. (2011). Hating Everything: A graphic coming-of-age tale. Girlhood Studies. 4(1), 67–94. doi:10.3167/ghs.2011.040106.

Hughes, J., King, A., Fuke, V. and Perkins, M. (2011). Adolescents & ‘Autographics’: Reading and Writing Coming-of-Age Graphic Novels. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literature. 54 (8), 601-612. doi:10.1598/JAAL.54.8.5.

Hughes, J. and King, A. (2010). Dual Pathways to Expression and Understanding: Canadian Coming-of-Age Graphic Novels. Children’s Literature in Education, DOI 10.1007/s10583-009-9098-8.

King, A. (2008). Embracing the Modern: Edna Cress Staebler at the University of Toronto, 1926-1929. Historical Studies in Education, Spring/Summer, 69-88.

King, A. (2004). The Glendon College Experiment. In Escott Reid: Diplomat and Scholar, Greg Donaghy and Stéphane Roussel, eds. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

King, A. (2001). The Experience of Women Students at Four Universities, 1895-1930. In Framing Our Past: A History of Women in Canada in the Twentieth Century, Sharon Anne Cook, Lorna R. McLean, and Kate O’Rourke, eds. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 160-165.

King, A. (1999). Centres of 'home-like influence': Residences for Women at the University of Toronto. Material History Review 49 (Spring), 39-59.

King, A. and Avi J. Hyman. (1999). Women’s Studies and the Internet: A Future with a History. Resources for Feminist Research/Documentation sur la recherche feministe 27, 1/2: 13-24

King, A. (1994). The Experience of Students in the 'New Era': Discourse and Gender in The Varsity, 1919-1929. Ontario Journal of Higher Education, 39-56.

Articles in refereed conference proceedings

Fernando, S.I. and King, A.E. (Accepted). Education Interrupted: Learning Careers of Adults Living with Mental Illness. European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA). Access, Learning Careers and Identities Network Conference. Seville, Spain. November 2015.

King, A.E., Eamer, A., and Ammar, N. (Accepted). Participation and Persistence: An Analysis of Immigrant Visible-Minority Students at UOIT. European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA). Access, Learning Careers and Identities Network Conference. Seville, Spain. November 2015.

King, Alyson and Fernando, Shanti I. (2015). Is Knowledge Power? An exploration of an historical normative framework for literacy policy, adult education and the economy in Canadian communities. Warwick Lifelong Learning Annual Conference, England.

Eamer, Allyson, Fernando, Shanti, and King, Alyson. (2015). Still on the margins: English language learning and mental health. Conference Proceedings, Ireland International Conference on Education, Dublin, Ireland.

King, Alyson and Fernando, Shanti I. (2015). Keep Stop Start: Assessing a supported education program for persons living with mental illness. Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, Hawaii.

Fernando, Shanti I. and King, A.E. (2014). Supported Adult Literacy Education for Persons Living with Mental Illness: Quality of Life and Social Implications. Conference Proceedings, Canadian Association for Studies in Adult Education Annual Meeting.

Fernando, S. I. and King, A. (2013). The Economy and Beyond: The Benefits of Life-long Literacy.  32nd National Conference of the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE)/ L’Association Canadienne pour l’Étude de I’Éducation des Adultes (ACÉÉA), Conference Proceedings, June 3-5, 2013, University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C. Edited by: Colleen Kawalilak and Janet Groen.

Recent research grants

Diversities of resilience: understanding the strategies for success used by underrepresented students in Canadian universities (SSHRC Partnership Development Grant: $135,794)

  • Research will examine how underrepresented post-secondary students from across Canada are able to be successful in persisting to graduation.
  • Dr. Alyson E. King (PI); co-investigators: Drs. Nawal Ammar (UOIT), Dr. Allyson Eamer (UOIT), Dr. Susan Brigham (MSVU), Lorena Fontaine (University of Winnipeg), and Dr. Fiona McQuarrie (University of the Fraser Valley).
  • two years (2016-2018)

Increasing literacies through supported education and policies of inclusion (SSHRC Insight Grant: $169,389)

  • Project will examine supported education programs for adults at psychiatric hospitals across Canada.
  • Dr. Shanti Fernando (PI); UOIT Co-Investigators Dr. Alyson King; Dr. Allyson Eamer; Dr. Tyler Frederick; Dr. Laura Pinto; Collaborators: John Rodnick- Waypoint Centre for Mental Health Care; Kathryn Kunkel Selkirk Mental Health Centre. 
  • five years (2016-2021)

Participation and persistence: An analysis of immigrant visible-minority students at UOIT (UOIT SSHRC Small Research Grant Program: $2,908)

  • This research that aims to understand the prevailing facilitative factors (both structural and individual) that help immigrant visible minority university students to succeed.
  • Dr. Alyson E. King (PI); co-investigators: Dr. Allyson Eamer and Dr. Nawal Ammar.
  • one year (2014-2015)

Academic Integrity Project (Teaching Innovation Fund Grant: $17,222)

  • Principal Investigator on applied research project to develop new resources and tools for UOIT’s academic integrity website; created learning modules, quizzes, teaching assignments and activities, and case studies to assist in teaching the fundamentals of academic integrity.
  • one year (2014-2015)

Supported Literacy Education for Persons Living with Mental Illness: Exploring Economic and Social Implications (SSHRC Insight Development Grant: $50,926)

  • Case study of the Supported Education Program at Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, in Whitby, Ontario, to understand the social, economic and political implications of low literacy skills for people living with mental illness.
  • Dr. Shanti Fernando (PI); co-investigators: Drs. Alyson E. King, Allyson Eamer, Wendy Stanyon, UOIT, and Ms. Wanda Huntington, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences.
  • two years (2013-2015)

Voices of UOIT oral history project (funded through Provost’s Office)

  • Oral history interviews that will be deposited into the university archives. Three undergraduate research assistants (through the STAR awards and University Works programs) in each year of the project assisted in conducting interviews, transcribing interviews, recording interviews and organizing project.
  • Dr. Shirley Van Nuland (PI) and Dr. Alyson E. King (co-investigator). Funded by the Provost’s Office, UOIT.
  • three years (2010-2013)

Dr. MacNeill’s research focuses on the political economy of sustainable global development. Here, 'development' does not necessarily imply economic growth or technological change, but simply making life better, more enduring, and more just for all members of human society and the ecosystem in which that society is intermeshed. This involves examination of all forms of inequality. In addition to economic, gender, ethnic and political forms of inequality, his research interests include the unequal relation between human and all other species and the ways in which cultural inequalities are perpetuated by international development discourse and within the mass-media driven public sphere.

Dr. MacNeill’s book, Life in a Cultural Economy: Music, Markets, and Development, explored the ways in which market power in the music industry distorts opportunities and schematizes content in cultural industries. This publication was the result of his previous experience as a recording artist and of a case-study of the music industry in Canada. His second major study focused on the assertion of alternative models of development by Maya social movements in Guatemala amidst dramatic political, cultural and economic inequalities. More recently, he has carried out a five-year study of the impact Canadian investment has had on Afro-Indigenous peoples in Honduras. In addition to these major research projects, he has undertaken experimental, survey-based and theoretical studies on racial inequality in education, determinants of altruistic behaviour, sustainable food systems, subjective well-being measures of development, and the use of complex adaptive systems theory in the political economy of global development.

Research/teaching/supervision areas: 

  • cultural economics
  • inequality and development
  • international development
  • international political economy
  • social policy
  • social problems
  • sociology

Selected publications

Lies, Discrimination, and Internalized Racism: Findings from the Lab. Management Science. Under Review 2016. (With D. Wozniak).

Development as Imperialism: Power and the Perpetuation of poverty in Afro-Indigenous Communities of Coastal Honduras. Humanity & Society, Sept. 2015.

Culturally Sustainable Development: Maya Culture, Indigenous Institutions, and Alternative Development in Guatemala. Cultural Dynamics. 26(3), p. 299-325, 2014.

Environmental Citizenship, Maya Cosmovision, and Cultural Rights in Guatemala. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, 7(4), p. 17-30, 2014.

The End of Transformation? Culture as the Final Fictitious Commodity. Problématique, Vol 12, 2010.

Life in a Cultural Economy: Music, Markets, and Development. VDP Verlag, 2009.

Radical Indigenous Subjectivity: Maya Resurgence in Guatemala. The International Journal of Diversity, 8(2): 98-106. (With Evelyn Gere), 2008.

On the Production and Maintenance of Discursive Power: Cultural Policy Beyond the Nation State. Stream, 1(1): 3-21, 2008.

The Interactive Complexity of Agency: Existing and Emergent Theories of the Culture of Economics and the Economics of Culture. International Journal of the Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 2(1): 57-64, 2007.

Audiences Authoring Authors: Cultural Production of Value, Cultural Industries, and Copyright. International Journal of Arts in Society, 2(1): 43-50, 2007.

Recent research grants

Food: Locally Embedded; Globally Engaged (2015-2020)

  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Centre (SSHRC), Insight Partnership Grant
  • Value: $2.5 million
  • 50 collaborators

Development or Marginalization: The Social, Environmental, Economic, Health, and Cultural impacts of Foreign Investment in Honduras (2015-2016)

  • SSHRC, Insight Development Grant
  • Value $65,000

Culturally Sustainable Development (2009-2010)

  • Ontario Graduate Scholarship
  • Value: $16,000

Culturally Sustainable Development (2008-2009)

  • SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship
  • Value: $22,000

Dr. Aquanno holds a PhD in Political Science from York University as well postdoctoral fellowships in Global Political Economy and Innovation Policy from the University of Toronto. In 2015, he was named a Senior Associate at the Innovation Policy Lab and awarded a Visiting Research Fellowship from the Munk School of Global Affairs. Previously, he served as an invited researcher at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, where he sat on the Political Economy of Central Banking and Monetary Policy working group.

Dr. Aquanno has published widely on monetary policy development and the political economy of finance and globalization is currently completing his first book, The Crisis of Risk: Post Structuralism and Post Institutionalism in Post War Financial Markets. His current research agenda is developed, in good part, around the social and economic impacts of global economic restructuring. He is co-leading a cross-faculty study into the ongoing transformation of the Oshawa labour market and is the principal investigator on the Durham Region Living Wage project.

Research/teaching/supervision areas

  • economics
  • financialization and the politics of central banking
  • global political economy
  • innovation policy and the fragmentation of global production
  • labour market restructuring
  • monetary policy
  • neoliberal social and economic policy

Selected publications

Aquanno, S.M. (2016). Some Inflationary Aspects of Distributive Conflict. Journal of Economic Issues, 50(3), with J. Brennan.

Aquanno, S.M. (2016). The Politics of Canadian Monetary Policy. Journal of Economic Issues, 50(4), with J. Brennan.

Aquanno, S.M. (2016). Profiting Without Producing: How Finance Exploits As All. New Proposals, 8(2)

Aquanno, S.M. (2015). American Empire and the Relative Autonomy of European Capitalism. Competition and Change, 19(2), Special Issue, The European Crisis and Imagined Recovery, eds. Claes Belfrage Cedric Durand, with L. Panitch and S. Gindin.

Aquanno, S.M. (2015). Crisis, Learning and Continuity: The Institutional Origins of Subprime Management at the Federal Reserve. Competition and Change, 19(1).

Aquanno, S.M. (2015). The Development of Financial Failure Supervision. In ed. J.D. VanVactor. Crisis Management: A Leadership Perspective. New York: Nova Science Publishers Ltd.

Aquanno, S. M. (2014). Contesting New Monetary Policy. Contributions to Political Economy, 33(1)

Aquanno, S. M. (2014). The Institutional Dimensions of Financial Crisis Management. Contemporary Politics, 20(2).

Aquanno, S.M. (2008). US Power and the International Bond Market: Financial Flows and the Construction of Risk Value. In eds Leo Panitch and M. Konings. American Empire and the Politics of International Finance. Toronto: Palgrave.

Aquanno, S. M. (2008). The Dollar Standard in Crisis. Relay Journal, 26 (April/May).

Aquanno, S.M. (2009). The Political Economy of the Subprime Crisis. In eds. Leo Panitch and M. Konings. American Empire and the Politics of International Finance 2nd Edition. Toronto: Palgrave, with Leo Panitch, Martijn Konings and Sam Gindin.

Recent research grants

Community Quality of Life: The Impact of Globalization in Canada’s Car Manufacturing Capital (2015-2016)

  • Co-Principal Investigator
  • Atkinson Foundation for Social and Economic Justice, Atkinson Decent Work Fund
  • approximate value: $40,000

A Game of Life Chances: Developing an App-Based Video Game to Educate the Public About the Research on Inequality in Canada (2015-2016)

  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council, Small Research Grant, with Dr. Tylor Frederick and Dr. Pejman Mirza-Babael
  • approximate value: $5,000

Pathways out of Homelessness in Durham Region: Singles at Risk of Homelessness Study.

  • Regional Municipality of Durham, Social Services Department, Innovation and Research Unit Research Funding Grant
  • approximate value: $5,000
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