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eSSENTIAL ACCESSIBILITY Crisis Centre

Information Politics

Law and policy are at the heart of all information and communication industries. The extent to which governments intervene can have a tremendous impact on the development of industry as well as its evolution. Access to services, market competition, speech and privacy protections, surveillance practices, intellectual property, content and cultural policy and a host of other policy issues fuel some of the most heated debates in the discipline. UOIT CDMS researchers engage in a variety of these, investigating policymaking processes, the policies themselves and the resulting impact on industry, government, NGOs and the general public.


Affiliated faculty

Publications

2014

    • Douai, A. (2014). “The police and the populace”: Canadian media’s visual framing of the G20 Toronto Summit. Canadian Journal of Communication, 39(2), 175-192.

2013

    • Genosko, G. (2013). When Technocultures Collide: Innovation from Below and the Struggle for Autonomy. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

2012

  • Douai, A., & Nofal, H. K. (2012). Commenting in the online Arab public sphere: Debating the Swiss minaret ban and the “Ground Zero” mosque online. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 266–282.
  • Douai, A. (2012). “In YouTube we trust”: The role of video exchange in Arab political reform. In J. Lannon and E. Halpin (Eds), Human rights and information communication technologies: Trends and consequences of use, (pp. 57-71). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.
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